Material Delivery QC Checklist

Use this checklist to verify material deliveries on the jobsite and properly communicate to both field and office teams that the material type and quantity is accurate and where the material is staged.

Question Response Type
1. Who from your company received the material delivery? Text Answer
2. What company delivered the material? Text Answer
3. What is the name of the driver who delivered the material? Text Answer
4. Was the invoice for the material delivery attached? Yes No N/A
5. Where is the material stored? Text Answer

What is material delivery quality control?

Quality control for material deliveries ensures the right type of material (and material quantity) is delivered to the jobsite safely. Quality control also looks at if the delivery was communicated properly between the field and the office—from start to finish.

Why is quality control for material deliveries important?

Having the right type and quantity of materials at the beginning of a project is essential to staying on schedule.

If your field crew doesn’t have the materials they need for a project, they can’t start it. That means a lot of back-and-forth, frustration, and inevitable project delays. Pushing back a project is not only bad for your business in terms of extra costs, your clients will be unhappy, too. As a result, your overall client satisfaction will take a hit—making it harder to win back business.

Quality control, and effective communication, are key for preventing project delays and keeping everyone (from your crews to your clients) happy.

What are potential safety hazards with material deliveries?

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), potential hazards for workers with handling materials include:

  • Back injuries (especially from material weight and bulkiness)
  • Falling objects (like improperly stacked materials)
  • Strains from equipment handling
  • When moving materials manually, OSHA says, “Workers should attach handles or holders to loads. In addition, workers should always wear appropriate personal protective equipment and use proper lifting techniques.”

    For moving materials mechanically, OSHA recommends “Letting the weight, size, and shape of the material being moved dictate the type of equipment used.” (And don’t overload equipment, either.)

    OSHA also says workers should seek help with heavy loads, and limited visibility from loading materials.

    What are other ways I can track my materials (and their movement)?

    Raken’s Production Tracking tools let you monitor your project’s progress with real-time production data.

    With our mobile app, field crews can quickly record quantities of materials installed throughout the day—and assign them cost codes. They can also add photos, notes, or other attachments to create a clear visual record of progress in the field.

    From the app, field crews can also send you equipment data (like notes and hourly usage). Leveraging your historical data for equipment, you can avoid extra rental costs and downtime for maintenance. Improving your productivity is easier than ever.

    See how this checklist works in the app

    There’s an easier way to find and complete construction checklists—and we'd love to walk you through it in a personalized demo. (All demos come with a 15-day free trial, too.)

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