Demolition Checklist

Demolition is an inherently dangerous construction task. This checklist is a reference to assist in safe demolition.

Question Response Type
1. Has all plumbing and HVAC piping been shut off, drained or safely cut and capped? Yes No N/A
2. Has all electrical been de-energized for safe removal? Yes No N/A
3. Do all personnel have the appropriate PPE for the demo task? Yes No N/A
4. Will this task create any silica based dust? Yes No N/A
5. If yes, what measures will be taken to ensure the air quality will be managed? Text Answer
6. Are there any unique or heavy items that might require mechanical assistance? Yes No N/A
7. If yes, what measures will be taken to ensure these items are safely handled? Text Answer

What is demolition?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) defines demolition as the “dismantling, razing, destroying, or wrecking” of a building. This includes demolishing a building’s structure or parts—and not necessarily the whole thing.

Some common methods of demolition are:

  • Implosion
  • High reach arm
  • Wrecking ball
  • Selective demolition
  • Why is safety in demolition important?

    Every line of work in construction comes with its risks. However, there are additional hazards involved with demolition that make it especially risky.

    How do extra safety risks affect your jobsite? With an increased chance of workplace injuries, your project’s schedule or budget can potentially be set back. This results in lower productivity, lower team morale, and unexpected costs.

    With the right planning, personal protective equipment, and safety training, you can protect your demolition crews from harm.

    What are the top safety risks in demolition?

    According to OSHA, the most frequently cited demolition standard is preparatory operations. This refers to the review and inspection of a site (and its potential hazards) before starting work. Preparatory operations accounts for “up to three-fourths” of citations on a demolition site.

    Out of all preparatory operations, the most common citation is not completing an engineering survey. Before starting work, a surveyor must check the structure’s condition—and note anywhere the structure could potentially collapse.

    Properly reviewing, and preparing, your demolition site will ensure your workers stay safe.

    What are other ways I can keep my demolition site safe?

    Our digital daily reports make it easy for you to get project updates in real time. Field crews can use the mobile app to write notes and attach photos, too. Then, you get all that field data in a clean, branded PDF report for maximum visibility.

    Digital toolbox talks help your crews stay educated on important safety topics—before and during a job. With bulk scheduling and digital attendance sheets, it’s easier than ever to keep your safety documentation in one place.

    See how this checklist works in the app

    There’s an easier way to find and complete construction checklists—and we'd love to walk you through it in a personalized demo. (All demos come with a 15-day free trial, too.)

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